Year: 2014

cover letter
11
Nov2014

Is The Cover Letter Dead?

 

Is the Cover Letter dead?

Now this is a topic and a half, but we’ll aim to address it in as few words as possible.

The answer in our opinion is; ‘yes’ and ‘no’. Let us explain…

As most recruiters will testify, we simply don’t have the time to read covering letters from every candidate who applies for every job. Even the ‘super candidate’ who ends up speaking with the recruiter for 1 hour, probably still won’t get his cover letter read.

So why not?

Well, in our humble opinion, a lot of cover letters, are not very well written, or they repeat what is essentially in the CV, and they are not promoted by the employer, the candidate or the recruiter. A bit of a vicious cycle.

The remedy in our opinion is to ‘tailor’ and ‘streamline’ the cover letter and turn it into an ‘addendum’ depending on the job you are going for, the specific skills required; maybe the culture of the prospective employer.

This is where the candidate needs to ‘work smarter’– get as much information about the prospective employer from the recruiter as possible, and then offer to put a brief paragraph or two together, for them to send in the body of the email, to the client, with the CV.

The recruiter should also be pro-active and suggest this to the candidate too.

Straight away, the prospective employer feels like the candidate (and recruiter) have done their homework, and because the cover letter is now in the form of a ‘bite sized chunk’ on email – it is 10x more likely to be read and will have much more of an impact.

If you are applying directly to an employer then, maybe, and depending on how niche your skills are – it could be worth putting a brief covering letter together, but the key is keep it concise and to the point.

Jonothan Bosworth Recruitment Specialists are currently recruiting for a number of vacancies. Please check some of our listed jobs here; https://jonothanbosworth.co.uk/jobs/

If you are a client in search of a new recruitment partner, or a candidate looking for your next challenge, please contact us on; 0845 299 6369.

30
Sep2014

Linked In Hide & Seek

As recruiters, we always want people (clients, candidates, referrals) to know that we’ve viewed their profile.

At the very least, using LinkedIn alongside other social networks, isn’t about being bashful with our digital presence, it’s about making sure our target markets are aware of our existence… That’s essentially how a ‘recruitment network’ is built.

So why are so many recruiters still playing social recruiting hide and seek, by restricting their profile identity when they look at profiles?

Let us give you an example of what we mean. We know from Google’s research that when most people use a search engine, they typically only use 2 or 3 words to do a search – e.g. ‘Sales Job Birmingham’. Then you get the results page – typically of ten results (aside from all the sponsored posts). How many of you even look past page one? We don’t have the stats, but I would imagine that it’s not too many!

Due to the clever search engines, like Google, Bing & Yahoo, these ten results will likely yield the links to take you to the right sites to help you find what you need. This ‘minimalist’ searching method also prevails across all the social networks, as we all use the same search habits on whichever platform we use to find stuff.

Unless someone has your name, or you have been included in one of LinkedIn’s referral links such as ‘People You May Know‘, ‘People Similar To‘ or ‘People Also Viewed’ then the chances are,  you are going to have to rely on being found in someone’s search.

So how will people find you?

Well, if you are a recruiter it would be natural for someone to use either of the words recruiting, recruitment, resource or recruiter, wouldn’t it? After all, these are the words that (from our experiences) most people associate with someone that is in a recruitment function. Then when they see the results of their search they see 10 search results (on the first page) showing pictures, names, headlines and relevant lines of their profiles that show the matched keywords.

Now here comes the hide and seek game!

What are some of the many job titles that companies and recruitment agencies give to their employees? Do any of these fit your role – Account Manager, Senior Account Manager, Sourcer, Talent Acquisition Manager, HR Advisor, Talent Scout, Talent Executive, Principal Consultant, Senior Consultant, Team Leader, Owner, Director etc etc

There is of course nothing wrong with these job titles UNLESS you are actively recruiting people via LinkedIn (or any other social media network for that matter). You are not going to appear in as many people’s searches if you use these titles on LinkedIn without the words – recruiting, recruitment or recruiter – associated to them. The recruitment and HR industry is brilliant at using job titles that mean ‘diddly’ to anyone outside recruitment, or even their own company! You may be an Account Manager for your recruitment agency, but for what or for who? It means nothing to the outside world. Just add the word recruitment to the front of the title and suddenly your job title has some meaning to someone outside your company – Recruitment Account Manager, or for other examples: Citrix Support Analyst, VMware Technical Consultant, HR Business Manager and so on…

Our favourite example of this is a financial recruitment company that had given all their many recruitment consultants job titles such as ‘Principal Consultant’, ‘Senior Consultant’ and ‘Managing Consultant’, to make them appear more finance related. They also deliberately wanted to distance themselves from other recruitment agencies. They had their profile summaries ‘professionally’ written for them (they were all the same!), and they avoided using the word ‘recruitment’ anywhere. The MD thought their profiles were brilliant and really put their company on a professional pedestal!

Then the MD was shown some simple Linked In searches that their typical candidates would do to find them. Upon reaching page ten of search results on LinkedIn, and still not one of his consultants appeared… he realised the error!

We are in a candidate driven marketplace and we all need to make sure we maximise every opportunity to be found by the right people – recruiters are absolutely no different.

We also need candidates to find us.

So remember, think of the audience you are trying to reach and use the language they normally use to describe your job function – and then use those in your social media profiles.

Jonothan Bosworth Recruitment Specialists currently have a host of job opportunities. Call us in complete confidence on; 0845 299 6369

 

31
Jul2014

The Secret Thoughts Of JobSeekers & Employers

Recruiting for today’s current in-demand positions gives everyone involved with the process the ‘heebee jeebees’.  Jobseekers suffer from spam, recruiters hate pestering people for a living, and ever-more-desperate employers wish they could just talk to some serious, intelligent people who know how to get the job done. These are just a couple of the secret thoughts…

Jonothan Bosworth Recruitment Specialists are calling for a reinvention of the entire “recruitment” process, starting with the way we talk, describe and explain it! With a change of mindset, we can actually start to change the age-old system and make everyone happier: employers & hiring managers, job seekers (both active and passive), and recruiters themselves….

Except, we have a new name for recruiters.  We want to call ourselves ‘connectors’, and this is quite fitting, with one of our company-wide phrases being; ‘We Connect People!’

Serious job seekers want to talk with their fellow professionals and people that understand the process of ‘seeking employment’, not just the process of ‘fulfilling a vacancy’. They don’t want to be a number on database, and they don’t want to run through a gauntlet of recruiters and HR screeners who know nothing about their area of expertise. Hiring managers are jaded by hearing the same two dimensional sales pitch, when all they really want to do, is to deal with someone who has a genuine enthusiasm for their work and the role they’re aiming to fill, and a transparency in regards to the way they work too. Recruiters make them both shudder. However, smart, engaged, peer-to-peer conversations make them feel warm and fuzzy.

Let’s get everyone feeling warm and fuzzy about recruitment! …sorry, I mean about connecting people! 🙂

If you are a client in search of a new recruitment partner, or a candidate looking for your next challenge, please contact Jonothan Bosworth Recruitment Specialists on; 0845 299 6369

 

12
Jun2014

Recruitment vs World Cup

 

Recruitment vs World Cup

Check out our latest jobs here; https://jonothanbosworth.co.uk/jobs/

..As the nation gets ready to enjoy the spectacle of the World Cup, I can’t help but compare recruitment to this great tournament…

Warm up games are very much like the preparatory work that we do as recruiters, when we’re thinking about which clients and candidates to network with and the reasons why we wish to engage with them… It is usually here, that you build your ‘pipeline’ and expectancy for the future.

Winning your World Cup ‘warm up’ games usually sets the tone for how the tournament will go, hence the comparison.

Now, let’s move on to the very first game of the tournament – I will liken this to the moment that you either secure the opportunity to work with a client, and/or put your candidate in front of a potential hirer… How well you execute this process, is a ‘bench mark’ for how the client / candidate will engage with you, from this point moving forward.

How England (or any other nation) perform in the 1st game will very much set an expectation level for the rest of the group stage games…

Now, this is where things start to get interesting… If your first foray (i.e. your client is interested in your 1st candidate) goes to plan, then the request to introduce more candidates, is usually ‘accepted’.  Let’s take this back to the World Cup analogy…If the 1st game goes well, then the players feel confident in expressing themselves and the ‘belief’ that they can ‘win again’ becomes a reality…. As a recruiter, the belief that you can find more candidates that are as good or better than the 1st candidate that you sent to your client grows and breeds the necessary confidence to ‘reproduce’ at the same level.

We are now in the ‘knock-out stages’ – this is where the CV’s you’ve sent will qualify for interview (or not), and have a chance to present themselves in an interview – where they will either rise or fall under the clients’ expectation.

Again, this is very much like the reality of the quarter-final and semi-final of a World Cup.

We are now into the home straight.  The World Cup final!

Will your candidate hold his/her nerve when it comes to meeting the CEO? Will the [England] players, hold their nerve in a penalty shoot-out in the final [against Germany]?

Now, provided that the preparation and planning was right. Provided that the hard work has been put in at every stage of the process. And provided that you remain ‘positive’, ‘constructive’ and ‘determined’ to succeed, there is no reason why you shouldn’t lift the Cup!

In this case, the ‘World Cup’ represents a satisfied client, a happy candidate, and a fee for your services!

Now. Go and win the Euros!

Check out our latest jobs here; https://jonothanbosworth.co.uk/jobs/

13
May2014
31
Mar2014

It’s Monday, Feel ‘Genius’

 

It’s Monday! and whilst many of us are still shaking off the weekend, and trying desparately to stay awake, until 5.30pm, some of us, are thinking like Geniuses!

Whether you are the CEO or the TBO (Tea Boy Officer), the way you think on a Monday, can drastically affect the direction that the rest or your week, month, (and if we want to be really dramatic), year pans out!

Juan Ponce de León spent his life searching for the fountain of youth. The author of this peice (in future referred to as “I” or “me”) spent hers searching for the ideal daily routine. But as years of color-coded paper calendars have given way to cloud-based scheduling apps, routine has continued to elude me; each day is a new day, as unpredictable as a ride on a rodeo bull and over seemingly as quickly.

Naturally, I was fascinated by the recent book, Daily Rituals: How Artists Work. Author Mason Curry examines the schedules of 161 painters, writers, and composers, as well as philosophers, scientists, and other exceptional thinkers.

As I read, I became convinced that for these geniuses, a routine was more than a luxury — it was essential to their work. As Currey puts it, “A solid routine fosters a well-worn groove for one’s mental energies and helps stave off the tyranny of moods.” And although the book itself is a delightful hodgepodge of trivia, not a how-to manual, I began to notice several common elements in the lives of the healthier geniuses (the ones who relied more on discipline than on, say, booze and Benzedrine) that allowed them to pursue the luxury of a productivity-enhancing routine:

A works space with mininal distractions. Jane Austen asked that a certain squeaky hinge never be oiled, so that she always had a warning when someone was approaching the room where she wrote. William Faulkner, lacking a lock on his study door, just detached the doorknob and brought it into the room with him — something of which today’s cubicle worker can only dream. Mark Twain’s family knew better than to breach his study door — if they needed him, they’d blow a horn to draw him out. Graham Greene went even further, renting a secret office; only his wife knew the address or telephone number. Distracted more by the view out his window than interruptions, if N.C. Wyeth was having trouble focusing, he’d tape a piece of cardboard to his glasses as a sort of blinder.

A daily walk. For many, a regular daily walk was essential to brain functioning. Soren Kierkegaard found his constitutionals so inspiring that he would often rush back to his desk and resume writing, still wearing his hat and carrying his walking stick or umbrella. Charles Dickens famously took three-hour walks every afternoon — and what he observed on them fed directly into his writing. Tchaikovsky made do with a two-hour walk, but wouldn’t return a moment early, convinced that cheating himself of the full 120 minutes would make him ill. Beethoven took lengthy strolls after lunch, carrying a pencil and paper with him in case inspiration struck. Erik Satie did the same on his long strolls from Paris to the working class suburb where he lived, stopping under streetlamps to jot down notions that arose on his journey; it’s rumored that when those lamps were turned off during the war years, his productivity declined too.

Accountability metrics. Anthony Trollope only wrote for three hours a day, but he required of himself a rate of 250 words per 15 minutes, and if he finished the novel he was working on before his three hours were up, he’d immediately start a new book as soon as the previous one was finished. Ernest Hemingway also tracked his daily word output on a chart “so as not to kid myself.” BF Skinner started and stopped his writing sessions by setting a timer, “and he carefully plotted the number of hours he wrote and the words he produced on a graph.”

A clear dividing line between important work and busywork. Before there was email, there were letters. It amazed (and humbled) me to see the amount of time each person allocated simply to answering letters. Many would divide the day into real work (such as composing or painting in the morning) and busywork (answering letters in the afternoon). Others would turn to the busywork when the real work wasn’t going well. But if the amount of correspondence was similar to today’s, these historical geniuses did have one advantage: the post would arrive at regular intervals, not constantly as email does.

A habit of stopping when they’re on a roll, not when they’re stuck. Hemingway puts it thus: “You write until you come to a place where you still have your juice and know what will happen next and you stop and try to live through until the next day when you hit it again.” Arthur Miller said, “I don’t believe in draining the reservoir, do you see? I believe in getting up from the typewriter, away from it, while I still have things to say.” With the exception of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart — who rose at 6, spent the day in a flurry of music lessons, concerts, and social engagements and often didn’t get to bed until 1 am — many would write in the morning, stop for lunch and a stroll, spend an hour or two answering letters, and knock off work by 2 or 3. “I’ve realized that somebody who’s tired and needs a rest, and goes on working all the same is a fool,” wrote Carl Jung. Or, well, a Mozart.

A supportive partner. Martha Freud, wife of Sigmund, “laid out his clothes, chose his handkerchiefs, and even put toothpaste on his toothbrush,” notes Currey. Gertrude Stein preferred to write outdoors, looking at rocks and cows — and so on their trips to the French countryside, Gertrude would find a place to sit while Alice B. Toklas would shoo a few cows into the writer’s line of vision. Gustav Mahler’s wife bribed the neighbors with opera tickets to keep their dogs quiet while he was composing — even though she was bitterly disappointed when he forced her to give up her own promising musical career. The unmarried artists had help, too: Jane Austen’s sister, Cassandra, took over most of the domestic duties so that Jane had time to write — “Composition seems impossible to me with a head full of joints of mutton & doses of rhubarb,” as Jane once wrote. And Andy Warhol called friend and collaborator Pat Hackett every morning, recounting the previous day’s activities in detail. “Doing the diary,” as they called it, could last two full hours — with Hackett dutifully jotting down notes and typing them up, every weekday morning from 1976 until Warhol’s death in 1987.

Limited social lives. One of Simone de Beauvoir’s lovers put it this way: “there were no parties, no receptions, no bourgeois values… it was an uncluttered kind of life, a simplicity deliberately constructed so that she could do her work.” Marcel Proust “made a conscious decision in 1910 to withdraw from society,” writes Currey. Pablo Picasso and his girlfriend Fernande Olivier borrowed the idea of Sunday as an “at-home day” from Stein and Toklas — so that they could “dispose of the obligations of friendship in a single afternoon.”

This last habit — relative isolation — sounds much less appealing to me than some of the others. And yet I still find the routines of these thinkers strangely compelling, perhaps they are so unattainable, so extreme. Even the very idea that you can organize your time as you like is out of reach for most of us — so I’ll close with a toast to all those who did their best work within the constraints of someone else’s routine. Like Francine Prose, who began writing when the school bus picked up her children and stopped when it brought them back; or T.S. Eliot, who found it much easier to write once he had a day job in a bank than as a starving poet; and even F. Scott Fitzgerald, whose early writing was crammed in around the strict schedule he followed as a young military officer. Those days were not as fabled as the gin-soaked nights in Paris that came later, but they were much more productive — and no doubt easier on his liver. Being forced to follow the ruts of someone else’s routine may grate, but they do make it easier to stay on the path.

And that of course is what a routine really is — the path we take through our day. Whether we break that trail yourself or follow the path blazed by our constraints, perhaps what’s most important is that we keep walking.

(c) Sarah Green. Havard Business Review

21
Mar2014

Stay Classy, Pick The Right Job, Know Your Worth

 

It’s Friday, and the Jonothan Bosworth Recruitment Specialists team insist that you ‘stay classy’ – and by that, we mean that you should always value your worth as an employee. Below are some important bits of information in relation to the ‘going rates’ based on the profession you’re in, or looking to move into.

Naturally, ‘money’ alone should never be the only determining factor, but it is a factor that needs consideration nonetheless. The information is not the opinion of Jonothan Bosworth Recruitment Specialists, but there are definitely some good information points here for you to take away…

…Miners and Couriers are the worst occupations in the UK according to the latest research from job search engine; Adzuna.  Translators and Web Developers were crowned as the best jobs of 2013. Doctors and Pilots suffer the most stress at work, while Travel Agents and Supermarket Cashiers have the worst outlook for 2014.

The study, conducted in September 2013, analysed over 2,000 job titles to highlight the best, worst, most stressful and most promising jobs in the UK. Each job title was scored based on 25 different criteria including earning potential, working conditions, competitiveness, unemployment rates and job security. These scores were then combined to produce an overall list of the top 10 best and worst jobs in the UK.

The Worst Jobs of 2013 – Miners and Couriers have the worst jobs in the UK the study has shown. High-pressure deadlines, the lowest income growth potential in the survey and long hours pushed these roles to the top the of “worst” list.  Sous chefs, Electricians and HGV Drivers round out the rest of the worst jobs.

The Best Jobs of 2013 – Taking the crown of best jobs on the market are Translators, Web Developers and Surgeons. These roles boasted the highest levels of job security in the study, some of the highest average salaries (exceeding £85,000 p.a.) and excellent income growth potential of up to 8 times starting salary. Lack of competition, employer demand, rising wages and excellent working environments also resulted in Web Developers being voted one of the most stress free jobs in the UK today.

The Most Stressful Jobs – Pilots & Oil Riggers have the most stressful jobs in the UK, scoring top for emotional and physical stress. Journalists rank as the 4th most stressful career choice, primarily due to highest pressure working environments and a deadline driven culture. Low levels of competition, few deadlines and little physical work have resulted in Librarians and Translators being named the least stressful jobs on the market.

Outlook – The Most & Least Promising Jobs – Roles in the IT and Engineering sectors dominate the best outlook list thanks to average wages growing 3.2% since January 2013 and advertised jobs increasing 23% over the same time period. At the other end of the spectrum, technological advancements and cuts at big firms such as Thomas Cook & The Royal Mail have affected the UK’s job market.  Jobs like Travel Agents, Postmen, Supermarket Cashier and Factory Workers are becoming increasingly redundant in today’s employment market.

Flora Lowther, Head of Research at Adzuna, says “Listing every available vacancy in the UK and studying the behavior of millions of monthly job seekers, gives us a unique insight into employee satisfaction levels and perceptions in today’s job market. Job seekers should be taking note of this research when thinking about their next career move.”

Top 10 Best Jobs in the UK

Rank

Job Title

Avg. Salary

(per annum)

No.of Jobs

Score *

1

Translator

£39,900

7,363

41

2

Web Developer

£34,600

13,081

41

3

Surgeon

£63,300

1,037

40

4

Lawyer

£56,300

2,909

39

5

Vet

£42,100

2,371

34

6

Pilot

£59,000

905

33

7

Actuary

£56,000

219

32

8

Physiotherapist

£65,000

1,547

31

9

Architect

£64,000

4,321

27

10

Dentist

£80,000

1,662

26

 

Bottom 10 Worst Jobs in the UK

Rank

Job Title

Avg. Salary

(per annum)

No. of Jobs

Score *

1

Miner

£40,500

401

-36

2

Courier

£30,200

1,403

-28

3

Builders Labourer

£22,200

6,354

-28

4

Journalist

£28,800

824

-27

5

Sous Chef

£21,256

3,957

-26

6

Electrician

£25,000

2,210

-23

7

HGV Driver

£20,700

2,426

-23

8

Waiter

£15,400

1,297

-20

9

Care Assistant

£18,800

8,530

-20

10

Housekeeper

£22,000

4,381

-8

 

* Scores were calculated to determine whether overall merits of each profession outweighed the negative factors. Positive scores represent professions where the positive outweigh the negative – the maximum score of 100 would be achieved if a profession scored full marks on salary and outlook factors whilst having zero negative factors.

 

5 Most and Least Stressful Jobs

Rank

Most Stressful Jobs **

Rank

Least Stressful Jobs **

1

Oil Riggers

1

Receptionist

2

Doctor

2

Librarian

3

Pilot

3

Translator

4

Journalist

4

Secretary

5

Fireman

5

Charity Worker

 

** The stress levels of jobs were calculated by ranking the inherent demands of the job against 15 different criterions. These criterion, including deadlines, competitiveness, physical and emotional risk are given a score out of an allotted range then the sum of which are combined to produce a stress level ranking. The more physically dangerous the stress, the greater weight it received

 

Top 5 Jobs with Most & Least Promise

Rank

Most Promising ***

Rank

Least Promising ***

1

Web Developer

1

Receptionist

2

Dentist

2

Travel Agent

3

Doctor

3

Waiter

4

Surgeon

4

Courier

5

Mechanical Engineer

5

Tattoo Artist

 

*** The level of promise of jobs was calculated by ranking promotion potential, income growth potential and job security

 

Blog Post Adapted From (C) Recruitment Buzz 2014

11
Mar2014

The Changing Face of Recruitment: Smaller Agencies Vs Large Agencies

 

The recruitment industry has seen its fair share of change in recent years. Technology is fast re-vamping the way in which recruiters source, screen and monitor candidates, Employer Branding is at the forefront of every in-house recruitment initiative and finally, the great global recession that hit us all so hard has diminished – leading the UK unemployment rate to drop to just 7.1%.

It’s a figure that has sparked much optimism for industries – not only are there over 30.15 million people in the UK now in work, but the flourishing confidence in the market is spurring smaller recruitment agencies to come through and climb the industry ranks.

As we see the back of the recession, we recognise that smaller recruitment agencies could really begin to set the cat amongst the pigeons in this changing industry.

Respected recruitment industry commentator Ian Knowlson has a lot to offer in terms of recruitment knowledge. Combining his 30 years of experience working in sales and recruitment and his 25 years coaching and developing – it’s safe to say that Ian knows what he’s talking about when it comes to the recruitment industry. He recently spoke to Simplicity’s MD, David Thornhill, to share his thoughts on the changing face of recruitment and what smaller recruitment agencies can offer the industry.

“Recruitment goes through cycles.” Ian says, “We have left a cycle where there was not a lot of jobs but a relative abundance of good quality candidates.” Ian is quick to realise that the new cycle looks set to stay. “Within the last three months, recruitment has passed an inflexion point. There are now more jobs than active candidates – something which we haven’t witnessed for a long time” he says, “Providing there is not another global recession, the industry shows no signs of entering the next cycle for at least 15 years.”

The news is long-awaited for job-seekers but it seems the current cycle brings with it a new issue. “By 2020 the EU will see a 23 million shortfall of good quality skilled candidates” Ian says. Think this figure is startling? So too does Ian – “By 2035, China will see a shortfall of 140 million”.

So why, in a world in which technology is making the impossible possible are these figures so high? “90% of all people entering the work force between 2010 and 2020 will merely be replacing the individuals leaving positions.” Ian says, “The ageing population of the western world plays a massive part, the baby boomers of the 50′s and 60′s are retiring – allowing the Gen-Y’s to come through.”

Whilst the introduction of younger candidates should promise a flow in the amount of digital natives entering the work place, Ian believes that the UK is failing to bring through high-skilled qualified workers. He says, “The country is lacking in what will be the core industries – Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths. There are simply not enough students studying these degrees at University.”

This shortfall, it seems, has yet to be realised by the very organisations that it will affect. “This is a macro strategic change that virtually all businesses are oblivious to.”

It isn’t all bad news however, as Ian adds, “Those that are aware of the change are the global enterprises such as McDonald’s, GE and Google”.

In 2010, Manchester Metropolitan University partnered up with McDonald’s to add a corporate degree to their prospectus. As well as its inclusion of McDonald’s, the University’s Business School also provides a qualification for super market giants Tesco – a concept which Ian believes will help recognise the skills needed for today. “McDonald’s and Tesco are fully aware of how fundamental talent is. They not only source talent, but secure it”, he says.

With that said, we are left wondering what the decrease in unemployment combined with the skills shortage prediction means for recruitment agencies in the UK. “Larger recruitment agencies should feel threatened. Small, up-and-coming agencies have the major advantage. They are more flexible, agile and most importantly, much quicker to react to such changes in the market.”

Ian’s support  for small agencies doesn’t end there – “Directors and Managers of smaller agencies have a much better understanding of the market and are able to respond more quickly to what  job-seekers and clients want and need out of an agency.”

Small and medium sized agencies account for a huge 85% of all recruitment agencies in the UK helping cement their position in the industry. We are now finding that these smaller agencies are able to fill the gaps that the larger agencies fail to do – offering a much more tailored service to their clients and candidates. “Littler agencies cater for a niche market – something which is hard to match.” Ian says, “Industries such as oil, gas and engineering are crying out for employees. You have an agency that deals specifically with such sectors and the reward will be greater profits and margins.”

Ian adds that “The boom in industries such as IT, Oil & Gas and Engineering has been one that is globally overheating with well-publicised shortages.” With jobs readily available and employment figures continuing to swell, it can be said that candidates will become harder and harder to source and maintain for agencies. “With the number of new recruits to these industries showing no signs of exceeding short term demands, it’s clear the role for niche recruitment agencies operating in the sectors is set to continue.”

With the demand for smaller agencies now a necessity not a luxury, what advice does Ian offer for those thinking of taking the plunge and starting up?

“There is no confusion with the economy – it is stable” he says, “With a recession, recruitment is the first thing that goes and the first that comes back. Now is as good a time as any to start an agency – on two conditions:

1 – Know how to recruit. You should have experience within the recruitment industry with particular focus on 2001-2008. Without this you will be learning at the same time as applying.

2 – Within the first 6-12 months of starting up, you need to network with candidates and clients alike.You’re let into their world and can understand it. It is essential that they feel supported and as recruiters, we must demonstrate that we have the knowledge to support our clients if we wish to fulfil the role of ‘partner’ rather than a mere ‘commodity supplier.’”

Blog Post Adapted From (C) Recruitment Buzz 2014