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Stay Classy, Pick The Right Job, Know Your Worth

 

It’s Friday, and the Jonothan Bosworth Recruitment Specialists team insist that you ‘stay classy’ – and by that, we mean that you should always value your worth as an employee. Below are some important bits of information in relation to the ‘going rates’ based on the profession you’re in, or looking to move into.

Naturally, ‘money’ alone should never be the only determining factor, but it is a factor that needs consideration nonetheless. The information is not the opinion of Jonothan Bosworth Recruitment Specialists, but there are definitely some good information points here for you to take away…

…Miners and Couriers are the worst occupations in the UK according to the latest research from job search engine; Adzuna.  Translators and Web Developers were crowned as the best jobs of 2013. Doctors and Pilots suffer the most stress at work, while Travel Agents and Supermarket Cashiers have the worst outlook for 2014.

The study, conducted in September 2013, analysed over 2,000 job titles to highlight the best, worst, most stressful and most promising jobs in the UK. Each job title was scored based on 25 different criteria including earning potential, working conditions, competitiveness, unemployment rates and job security. These scores were then combined to produce an overall list of the top 10 best and worst jobs in the UK.

The Worst Jobs of 2013 – Miners and Couriers have the worst jobs in the UK the study has shown. High-pressure deadlines, the lowest income growth potential in the survey and long hours pushed these roles to the top the of “worst” list.  Sous chefs, Electricians and HGV Drivers round out the rest of the worst jobs.

The Best Jobs of 2013 – Taking the crown of best jobs on the market are Translators, Web Developers and Surgeons. These roles boasted the highest levels of job security in the study, some of the highest average salaries (exceeding £85,000 p.a.) and excellent income growth potential of up to 8 times starting salary. Lack of competition, employer demand, rising wages and excellent working environments also resulted in Web Developers being voted one of the most stress free jobs in the UK today.

The Most Stressful Jobs – Pilots & Oil Riggers have the most stressful jobs in the UK, scoring top for emotional and physical stress. Journalists rank as the 4th most stressful career choice, primarily due to highest pressure working environments and a deadline driven culture. Low levels of competition, few deadlines and little physical work have resulted in Librarians and Translators being named the least stressful jobs on the market.

Outlook – The Most & Least Promising Jobs – Roles in the IT and Engineering sectors dominate the best outlook list thanks to average wages growing 3.2% since January 2013 and advertised jobs increasing 23% over the same time period. At the other end of the spectrum, technological advancements and cuts at big firms such as Thomas Cook & The Royal Mail have affected the UK’s job market.  Jobs like Travel Agents, Postmen, Supermarket Cashier and Factory Workers are becoming increasingly redundant in today’s employment market.

Flora Lowther, Head of Research at Adzuna, says “Listing every available vacancy in the UK and studying the behavior of millions of monthly job seekers, gives us a unique insight into employee satisfaction levels and perceptions in today’s job market. Job seekers should be taking note of this research when thinking about their next career move.”

Top 10 Best Jobs in the UK

Rank

Job Title

Avg. Salary

(per annum)

No.of Jobs

Score *

1

Translator

£39,900

7,363

41

2

Web Developer

£34,600

13,081

41

3

Surgeon

£63,300

1,037

40

4

Lawyer

£56,300

2,909

39

5

Vet

£42,100

2,371

34

6

Pilot

£59,000

905

33

7

Actuary

£56,000

219

32

8

Physiotherapist

£65,000

1,547

31

9

Architect

£64,000

4,321

27

10

Dentist

£80,000

1,662

26

 

Bottom 10 Worst Jobs in the UK

Rank

Job Title

Avg. Salary

(per annum)

No. of Jobs

Score *

1

Miner

£40,500

401

-36

2

Courier

£30,200

1,403

-28

3

Builders Labourer

£22,200

6,354

-28

4

Journalist

£28,800

824

-27

5

Sous Chef

£21,256

3,957

-26

6

Electrician

£25,000

2,210

-23

7

HGV Driver

£20,700

2,426

-23

8

Waiter

£15,400

1,297

-20

9

Care Assistant

£18,800

8,530

-20

10

Housekeeper

£22,000

4,381

-8

 

* Scores were calculated to determine whether overall merits of each profession outweighed the negative factors. Positive scores represent professions where the positive outweigh the negative – the maximum score of 100 would be achieved if a profession scored full marks on salary and outlook factors whilst having zero negative factors.

 

5 Most and Least Stressful Jobs

Rank

Most Stressful Jobs **

Rank

Least Stressful Jobs **

1

Oil Riggers

1

Receptionist

2

Doctor

2

Librarian

3

Pilot

3

Translator

4

Journalist

4

Secretary

5

Fireman

5

Charity Worker

 

** The stress levels of jobs were calculated by ranking the inherent demands of the job against 15 different criterions. These criterion, including deadlines, competitiveness, physical and emotional risk are given a score out of an allotted range then the sum of which are combined to produce a stress level ranking. The more physically dangerous the stress, the greater weight it received

 

Top 5 Jobs with Most & Least Promise

Rank

Most Promising ***

Rank

Least Promising ***

1

Web Developer

1

Receptionist

2

Dentist

2

Travel Agent

3

Doctor

3

Waiter

4

Surgeon

4

Courier

5

Mechanical Engineer

5

Tattoo Artist

 

*** The level of promise of jobs was calculated by ranking promotion potential, income growth potential and job security

 

Blog Post Adapted From (C) Recruitment Buzz 2014

CATEGORIES: Blog, Candidate Tips, News and Updates

The Changing Face of Recruitment: Smaller Agencies Vs Large Agencies

 

The recruitment industry has seen its fair share of change in recent years. Technology is fast re-vamping the way in which recruiters source, screen and monitor candidates, Employer Branding is at the forefront of every in-house recruitment initiative and finally, the great global recession that hit us all so hard has diminished – leading the UK unemployment rate to drop to just 7.1%.

It’s a figure that has sparked much optimism for industries – not only are there over 30.15 million people in the UK now in work, but the flourishing confidence in the market is spurring smaller recruitment agencies to come through and climb the industry ranks.

As we see the back of the recession, we recognise that smaller recruitment agencies could really begin to set the cat amongst the pigeons in this changing industry.

Respected recruitment industry commentator Ian Knowlson has a lot to offer in terms of recruitment knowledge. Combining his 30 years of experience working in sales and recruitment and his 25 years coaching and developing – it’s safe to say that Ian knows what he’s talking about when it comes to the recruitment industry. He recently spoke to Simplicity’s MD, David Thornhill, to share his thoughts on the changing face of recruitment and what smaller recruitment agencies can offer the industry.

“Recruitment goes through cycles.” Ian says, “We have left a cycle where there was not a lot of jobs but a relative abundance of good quality candidates.” Ian is quick to realise that the new cycle looks set to stay. “Within the last three months, recruitment has passed an inflexion point. There are now more jobs than active candidates – something which we haven’t witnessed for a long time” he says, “Providing there is not another global recession, the industry shows no signs of entering the next cycle for at least 15 years.”

The news is long-awaited for job-seekers but it seems the current cycle brings with it a new issue. “By 2020 the EU will see a 23 million shortfall of good quality skilled candidates” Ian says. Think this figure is startling? So too does Ian – “By 2035, China will see a shortfall of 140 million”.

So why, in a world in which technology is making the impossible possible are these figures so high? “90% of all people entering the work force between 2010 and 2020 will merely be replacing the individuals leaving positions.” Ian says, “The ageing population of the western world plays a massive part, the baby boomers of the 50′s and 60′s are retiring – allowing the Gen-Y’s to come through.”

Whilst the introduction of younger candidates should promise a flow in the amount of digital natives entering the work place, Ian believes that the UK is failing to bring through high-skilled qualified workers. He says, “The country is lacking in what will be the core industries – Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths. There are simply not enough students studying these degrees at University.”

This shortfall, it seems, has yet to be realised by the very organisations that it will affect. “This is a macro strategic change that virtually all businesses are oblivious to.”

It isn’t all bad news however, as Ian adds, “Those that are aware of the change are the global enterprises such as McDonald’s, GE and Google”.

In 2010, Manchester Metropolitan University partnered up with McDonald’s to add a corporate degree to their prospectus. As well as its inclusion of McDonald’s, the University’s Business School also provides a qualification for super market giants Tesco – a concept which Ian believes will help recognise the skills needed for today. “McDonald’s and Tesco are fully aware of how fundamental talent is. They not only source talent, but secure it”, he says.

With that said, we are left wondering what the decrease in unemployment combined with the skills shortage prediction means for recruitment agencies in the UK. “Larger recruitment agencies should feel threatened. Small, up-and-coming agencies have the major advantage. They are more flexible, agile and most importantly, much quicker to react to such changes in the market.”

Ian’s support  for small agencies doesn’t end there – “Directors and Managers of smaller agencies have a much better understanding of the market and are able to respond more quickly to what  job-seekers and clients want and need out of an agency.”

Small and medium sized agencies account for a huge 85% of all recruitment agencies in the UK helping cement their position in the industry. We are now finding that these smaller agencies are able to fill the gaps that the larger agencies fail to do – offering a much more tailored service to their clients and candidates. “Littler agencies cater for a niche market – something which is hard to match.” Ian says, “Industries such as oil, gas and engineering are crying out for employees. You have an agency that deals specifically with such sectors and the reward will be greater profits and margins.”

Ian adds that “The boom in industries such as IT, Oil & Gas and Engineering has been one that is globally overheating with well-publicised shortages.” With jobs readily available and employment figures continuing to swell, it can be said that candidates will become harder and harder to source and maintain for agencies. “With the number of new recruits to these industries showing no signs of exceeding short term demands, it’s clear the role for niche recruitment agencies operating in the sectors is set to continue.”

With the demand for smaller agencies now a necessity not a luxury, what advice does Ian offer for those thinking of taking the plunge and starting up?

“There is no confusion with the economy – it is stable” he says, “With a recession, recruitment is the first thing that goes and the first that comes back. Now is as good a time as any to start an agency – on two conditions:

1 – Know how to recruit. You should have experience within the recruitment industry with particular focus on 2001-2008. Without this you will be learning at the same time as applying.

2 – Within the first 6-12 months of starting up, you need to network with candidates and clients alike.You’re let into their world and can understand it. It is essential that they feel supported and as recruiters, we must demonstrate that we have the knowledge to support our clients if we wish to fulfil the role of ‘partner’ rather than a mere ‘commodity supplier.’”

Blog Post Adapted From (C) Recruitment Buzz 2014

CATEGORIES: Blog, News and Updates